Book Review: Lightpoints by Peter Kassan

Lightpoints

Title: Lightpoints
Author: Peter Kassan
Publisher: Melange Books, LLC

Published: March 24, 2013
Pages: 210
Source: ebook
 
What if you suddenly
discovered you had a sense-and powers-that almost no one else in the
world did? When Amanda Lindner Nichols, a 24-year-old graphic artist
living with her husband in Queens, New York, is revived from a
near-death experience, she discovers she perceives everyone around her
as points of light-but not with her eyes. She soon learns she can not
only perceive the life energy of others, but she can give and take it.
With the help of others like her, she brings her husband Chris to the
brink of death and back to bestow on him the same remarkable faculty,
and they’re the happiest they’ve been. But not for long. All over the
world, people who’ve been revived from their own near-death experience
at just the right moment discover themselves with these same unusual
powers. They find ways to use them-some for good and some for evil. When
Amanda and Chris encounter a ruthless group of gangsters with the same
faculty, tragedy follows-and Amanda faces the greatest challenge of her
life.
 
 

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Before I begin, I wanna thank
Peter Kassan for the email, I’m glad you chose me to review this book, I
honestly enjoyed it and I feel bad when I have something to do because that
means I can’t read this. So in return here’s my honest review;

Lightpoints is very much
different from the other books that I’ve read. The story is very different and
it is my first time to read something like that. The book possesses a good flow
of the story, it is interesting and unique. Having near death experiences and
out of body experiences is not a good sign to every people living on earth yet,
now? This book comes out and it gives a different perspective, the author gave
a twists about these experiences. 

I like the role of the characters
here in this book, they’re all simple citizens but what makes them different is
there lightpoints. Amanda is a working woman who got a lightpoint when she
experienced the near death experience. She’s married to Chris who is an artist
and a professor. Lisa became Amanda’s friend when they met at the NDE session
in the hospital, from there they became close and Lisa treated her like a long
lost friend. 

But of course, in a story it is
not complete when there is no villains. So these villains are not the typical
person who has power or something they have lightpoints also that they use for
a bad work, how do they use it? You guys should find out. 

Honestly, for me having a
lightpoint is something that is very much interesting, but then it will drag you
in danger. Reading this book will help you relax, it is very different from
other young-adult books that I’ve read. It is very interesting. It will not
give you so much things to think about but you’ll enjoy reading it. 

The book is exciting and you will
feel the urge to read it until you don’t notice you’re done with it.

Rating

  
Peter KassanI’ve been a writer since I was a teenager, when I became devoted to
poetry. I read as many poets and books about poetry as I could find. To
learn the art, I assigned myself the task of writing one poem a
day—whether I thought I had any ideas for one or not. After a while, I
had a few I thought were worthwhile, and began sending them out. I got a
couple of poems published in obscure literary journals and one in
Seventeen Magazine, which led me to being invited to contribute a poem
to a book called The Young at Prayer. Although I was—even then—an
atheist, I managed to write something for it.
In my twenties, I devoted myself to writing the next Great American
Novel, and actually wrote three of them (American novels, but not great
ones), supporting myself at first writing computer programs (which I’d
learned to do as an undergraduate). I’m now relieved that none of those
early works was published, and I’ve long since discarded the
manuscripts.

Also in my twenties, I earned a living with a variety of other kinds of
writing, including technical writing (software manuals) and educational
writing (instructional workbooks and audiotapes). I was also a staff
writer for an adult comedy-variety health education show for Children’s
Television Workshop, which was reviewed by Time Magazine as (if I recall
accurately) “the most dismaying new show of the season.”
Combining my love of writing with my interest in computer
programming, I became a technical writer for several software products
companies, eventually becoming a minority shareholder and executive vice
president of a small, privately held company. There, I wrote and
managed the writing of everything from software design documents to
marketing literature.Twenty-five years later, after it was sold to a
large computer company with a three letter name, I became one of those
celebrated risk-takers we’ve heard so much about. I started a company
based on what I thought was a bright idea of mine. Within a couple of
years, I’d crashed and burned, and discovered myself in financial ruin
and without a job. Trying to find a job in my industry or to establish a
consulting practice, I learned it was no industry for old men. Mostly
to keep myself sane, I decided to write a novel based on the germ of an
idea I’d had in my twenties. That became Lightpoints.
Oh, and along the way, I met the woman who would become my wife,
married her, raised two children, and housed as many as five cats at a
time. My wife and I now live in Connecticut. We’re down to only three
cats.

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